Upcoming Events

Upcoming Events

Sep
24
6:30 PM18:30

From the Islands to Eastern Parkway: A Transnational History of Carnival

  • Skylight Room (9th Floor), The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Ray Allen of Brooklyn College talks about his new book, Jump Up!, the first lengthy study of calypso and steelband music in the African diaspora, the first documented history of Brooklyn's soca music industry, and the first thorough account of the borough's Carnival J'ouvert celebration. Q&A follows with Harvey R. Neptune, author of Caliban and the Yankees: Trinidad and the United States Occupation.

Presented with the CUNY Graduate Center's Advanced Research Collaborative and The Institute for the African Diaspora in the Americas & Caribbean.

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Oct
15
6:30 PM18:30

Muting the City: New York's Struggle with Noise

  • Recital Hall (Ground Floor), The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Lilian Radovac of the University of Toronto talks about the history of noise control efforts under the LaGuardia, Lindsay, and Bloomberg administrations, drawing on her current book project, the first historical work to explore the subject. Arline Bronzaft, the CUNY psychologist who has advised five NYC mayors on noise control and helped the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) update its code in 2007, talks about the negative health and learning impacts of noise in NYC, and what can be done. Juan Pablo Bello, lead investigator at NYU's Sounds of New York City (SONYC) project, talks about how the "aural map" SONYC is creating to help the DEP measure and monitor noise, to better enforce the code.

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Nov
7
6:30 PM18:30

Year of Upheaval: 1919 and its Legacies

Hosted by The Museum of the City of New York

The year 1919 witnessed some of the most violent and far-reaching developments in modern U.S. history. A massive wave of labor strikes mobilized a quarter of all American workers, but along with a wave of anarchist bombings, the strikes also generated an anti-leftist backlash that changed the trajectory of labor relations in the Roaring Twenties. At the same time, a string of bloody race riots involving black veterans, migrants, and homeowners in the North and South made racist violence a reality of urban life. And the infamous "Palmer Raids" (partly organized by a young J. Edgar Hoover) led to the deportation of hundreds of leftists, creating the basis for the FBI's decades-long obsession with the Left. Together, these traumatic events helped spell the end of the Progressive Era.

In this conversation, presented at the Museum of the City of New York (MCNY), four historians reflect on that tumultuous year in NYC and beyond: Steve Jaffe, curator of MCNY's City of Workers, City of Struggle exhibition, sets the stage with images documenting how the transition from World War I to peacetime made New York a flashpoint for conflicts over labor, radicalism, and immigration; Shannon King of Worcester College talks about black-white relations in NYC leading up to 1919 and the impact of the “Red Summer”; Beverly Gage of Yale talks about Hoover and the origins of modern domestic surveillance; and Vivian Gornick talks about the effect of the crackdown on the Left in the years that followed. Moderated by historian Ted Widmer.

RSVP here (use the discount code 1919 for the Member rate of $10)

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Nov
8
6:30 PM18:30

JAMES H. WILLIAMS AND THE RED CAPS OF GRAND CENTRAL TERMINAL

  • Skylight Room (9th Floor), The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

In a feat of remarkable research and timely reclamation, Eric K. Washington uncovers the nearly forgotten life of James H. Williams (1878–1948), the chief porter of Grand Central Terminal’s Red Caps ― a multitude of Harlem-based black men whom he organized into the essential labor force of America’s most august railroad station. Washington reveals that despite the deeply racialized and often exploitative nature of the work, the Red Cap was a highly coveted job for college-bound black men determined to join New York’s bourgeoning middle class. Examining the deeply intertwined subjects of class, labor, and African American history, Washington chronicles Williams’s life, showing how the enterprising son of freed slaves successfully navigated the segregated world of the northern metropolis, and in so doing ultimately achieved financial and social influence. With this biography, Williams must now be considered, along with Cornelius Vanderbilt and Jacqueline Onassis, one of the great heroes of Grand Central’s storied past.

RSVP here.

Presented with the Leon Levy Center for Biography.

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Nov
20
5:30 PM17:30

​"Ladies and Gentlemen, The Bronx is Burning": A film screening and tribute

  • Martin E. Segal Theater (Ground Floor), The Graduate Center, CUNY (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Women Writing Women’s Lives and The Center for the Study of Women and Society join the Gotham Center in honoring its former director, Suzanne Wasserman, with a screening of the powerful new documentary, Decade of Fire, which tells the story of the burning of the South Bronx in the 1970s. Q & A follows with Producer / Directors Gretchen Hildebran and Vivien Vázquez Irizarry.

RSVP required (invitations will be sent to Gotham Center mail-list members in late October / early November; extra space has been reserved for overflow)

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Sep
17
6:30 PM18:30

The Many Lives of Michael Bloomberg

  • Gotham Center / Leon Levy Center (CUNY Graduate School) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Eleanor Randolph’s new book of the same title offers a revealing portrait of the business innovator, philanthropist, and former New York City mayor who continues to make national headlines. Randolph, a veteran New York Times reporter and editorial writer, who was a Biography Fellow at The Graduate Center, had unprecedented access to the famously private Bloomberg for this biography. She joins in a discussion with Sam Roberts, longtime New York Times columnist and editor and host of the TV program The New York Times Close Up With Sam Roberts.

RSVP here. This event will also be live-streamed.

Presented with the Leon Levy Center for Biography.

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