Staff

Staff

 
 
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Peter-Christian Aigner,
Director

Peter-Christian Aigner is a political and intellectual historian of twentieth-century America. His first book explores the life and career of Daniel Patrick Moynihan as a view onto the strains of American liberalism between the New Deal and the present century. The manuscript is contracted with Simon & Schuster, and will be the first scholarly biography to date of the national political / intellectual figure and New York City icon. He’s begun research on a second book, interrogating the structural dimensions of American exceptionalism, re-conceptualizing local and national history from a modern global perspective.

Dr. Aigner has published essays in The Nation, The Atlantic and The New Republic, presented original research on a variety of topics before numerous professional academic associations, worked for several years as the Journal of the History of Ideas 's assistant editor, and hosted a podcast on urban history for the New Books Network. Prior to being named The Gotham Center's acting director in 2016, he served as the organization's administrator, during which time he spearheaded the redesign of its website and the creation of several new features, including the Gotham blog, which he still manages.

As head of the Gotham Center, he leads all programming. At his initiative, the organization has introduced a variety of new projects, including the award-nominated podcast series for Open House New York Weekend, the New Books Network channel, the establishment of the Gotham Center’s first writing fellowship program, and the creation of its first research grant program.

More big projects are on the way.



 

Graduate Assistants

 
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Duangkamol Tantirungkij

Duangkamol Tantirungkij is a Ph.D. student in history at The Graduate Center, CUNY. Her research focuses on antislavery politics and party realignment in the 1850s. Currently, she is working on a project exploring how slavery influenced the development of legal institutions in the antebellum Northwest.

 
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Jessica Georges

Jessica Georges is a Ph.D. student in history at The Graduate Center, CUNY. Her Master’s thesis explored the role of food in establishing kinship ties in American southern slave quarters. The recipient of numerous academic grants, fellowships and awards, her current research focuses on slavery and gender in the early republic.


Click here for our K-12 staff director

 
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