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#1 2011-07-24 12:38:17

usaunite
New member
Registered: 2011-07-24
Posts: 2

Multi-Ethnic Neighborhoods or Streets In 1945 to 1948?

Does anyone know of a neighborhood or street where various types of people lived with ease? Imagine  a corner diner where  Irish, Italian, German, Polish might gather easily. Also could such a street support racial or religious diversity - ie could they live together - did they live together?

Where would GI's returning from the War go to live? - if not in their home towns? Where in NYC would they be able to move to from other parts of the country? Did they?  For example would a GI who lived in Iowa decide to move to NYC after their WWI experience - and if so where would they live?

Time Period  - 1945 to 1948

Thank you.

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#2 2011-07-25 17:13:16

Sal
Member
Registered: 2009-08-03
Posts: 2980

Re: Multi-Ethnic Neighborhoods or Streets In 1945 to 1948?

Many area's of Manhattan ,Brooklyn and Queens had furnishedrooms and neighborhood Luncheonet's,Coffee Shop,Horn & Hardarts and Greasy Spoons were found on most major Avenues.

Taxi drivers,day laborers-longshore men,construction,Wall St. messengers  and
Civil Servants.
You can add Greeks to your list.
A period where most VET'S were going to college or Vocational Schools under the GI bill.
I think you meant WW II?

Last edited by Sal (2011-07-29 07:13:38)

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#3 2011-07-26 01:03:54

usaunite
New member
Registered: 2011-07-24
Posts: 2

Re: Multi-Ethnic Neighborhoods or Streets In 1945 to 1948?

Yes, thank you WWII.

Any idea of a particular street that was multi-ethnic?

Thank you
t

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#4 2011-07-26 07:11:59

Sal
Member
Registered: 2009-08-03
Posts: 2980

Re: Multi-Ethnic Neighborhoods or Streets In 1945 to 1948?

Bayridge Brooklyn,Manhattan-East side from  20th Street to 96th. I can speak for the Ethnic groups you mention East 40's and 50's (1st & 2nd Avenues). Alphabet City Aveues A-C.

The book Song for Mary by Dennis Smith is good reference to what life was like in the 1950's on the East Side of Manhattan. Dennis was a few years older than me,but we both attended Kips Bay Boys Club at the same.

Last edited by Sal (2011-07-26 12:46:30)

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#5 2011-07-27 10:06:28

DaveGardner
Member
From: New York, New York
Registered: 2009-07-29
Posts: 61
Website

Re: Multi-Ethnic Neighborhoods or Streets In 1945 to 1948?

And cohabitation between the blacks and the Irish in Five Points was actually the first large-scale instance of volitional racial integration in the US.

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#6 2011-07-30 09:19:48

Sal
Member
Registered: 2009-08-03
Posts: 2980

Re: Multi-Ethnic Neighborhoods or Streets In 1945 to 1948?

Dave-And cohabitation between the Italians and Puerto Rican's in East Harlem would be another interesting study.

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#7 2011-08-19 05:55:09

Historian
Member
Registered: 2009-02-05
Posts: 25

Re: Multi-Ethnic Neighborhoods or Streets In 1945 to 1948?

Until the 50s, Italians lived east of Lexington from 96th to 116th and east of Madison from 116th to 125th.

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#8 2011-09-19 17:58:44

michael
Member
Registered: 2008-05-12
Posts: 1416

Re: Multi-Ethnic Neighborhoods or Streets In 1945 to 1948?

i never heard of blacks and the irish living in the 5 points, that would be worth st, the bowery, st james place, park place, division st; i can't imagine them living together.

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