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#1026 2010-10-18 09:46:34

Mike The Duck
Member
Registered: 2008-05-13
Posts: 197

Re: cambria heights, Queens

Thanks for a truly GREAT post, Tom and Joe, and welcome to the forum!

Yep, Wolf's Pond (I had forgotten about that), Dugan's, and the Strawberry man! Yep--being a patrol boy was cool, but not when you got "framed" for something you didn't do and then lost your badge. Yep--that happened to me in 8th grade. Over time a few students fessed up and told the nuns that it wasn't me who threw the piece of pretzel out of the first floor window. After a  number of weeks Sister Terese Ann (spelling?) returned my badge to me telling me I had "earned it back." Funny, but at the graduation ceremony they handed out certificates of merit to all graduating patrol boys--that's "all" except ME. I kept waiting to hear my name called (I'm still waiting 41 years later). I guess they did not want to give me a certificate as such an action might be tantamount to admitting they were wrong when they suspended for something someone else had done. I guess it's all ok, though, as I've earned a few other "certificates" since then (LOL)!

Welcome again, guys. Post often!

All the best,

Mike
Class of '69

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#1027 2010-10-18 20:02:32

TGHD
New member
Registered: 2010-10-16
Posts: 4

Re: cambria heights, Queens

Thanks Mike, did you go to the last reunion a week or so ago? I'm looking for some pics, can you advise?

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#1028 2010-10-19 09:06:56

Mike The Duck
Member
Registered: 2008-05-13
Posts: 197

Re: cambria heights, Queens

Yep, I was there and it was great. Quite an interesting "journey" or sorts, one I'm prepared to take again. A truly wonderful time.

You need to register on Facebook, and then look for the group Sacred Heart Reunion 2010 Multi Class. That's where you can find the pictures.

Mike

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#1029 2010-10-28 08:39:57

lorie922
Member
Registered: 2008-05-17
Posts: 55

Re: cambria heights, Queens

[quote=TGHD]Some of our memories of Cambria Heights:
Who can forget…
•    The caged Ferris type wheel that would drive down the block and the driver would solicit the children to take a ride, and how we would then, beg our parents to let us go on… Keep in mind 10 cents was good money back then.   
•    The Good Humor and Bungalow Bar competitive fight… Bad words were exchanged such as “Bungalow Bar tastes like tar the more you eat it the sicker you are.��  Mr. Softy seemed to love the rivalry… If you did not buy from one of them, there was always Carvel.
•    The Strawberry man… Remember him yelling… Straaaawwwberrieees as he drove his truck down the block.
•    During election time, you would hear loud speakers on top of cars, advertising for their candidate. 
•    The great Dugan pastry delivery man and I can always remember he smelled like the Pillsbury Dough Boy. He would come to your house and describe all the mouth watering fresh products he would have for the day… What a salesman!!!
•    The Milk Man delivering your milk in the summer… I don’t think there was ever such a thing as a good smelling milk box. We all remember forgetting to take the milk out of the box after three days of 90+ degree temperature. 
•    The nuclear scare and the sudden demand for bomb shelters…. We had one!!
•    The good, old Sunrise Drive in…. Not exactly in Cambria Heights, but that is where we all went when we wanted to go to a drive-in
•    The 227 street on 120th Ave.pool of water after the rain... It was called Wolf’s pond. 
•    Stick ball and stoop ball with our pensy- pinkys. 
•    The summer with lightning bugs.

Some of our memories of Sacred Heart:
Who can forget…
•    The cool feeling of walking down the halls with the sound of taps coming from your shoes
•    Walking down the hall and seeing a student outside the classroom standing in the hallway. You know that he or she did something wrong…. That was me, and every nun who walked by would ask me what I did… and then they took a piece of me
•    In the small schoolyard we would be entertained by Bruce and team with some great harmonizing / songs
•    The “Pit��  in the Big School yard, a place you did not want to go… Let’s just say it always seemed to be raining down there
•    Before school started and also when lunch was over the power of the bell.  When the Sister would ring that Golden Weapon it would automatically make everyone stop in their place and then with another clang, everyone would become mobile again and form a line
•    How good could a Hot Lunch be for $1.50 per week
•    That the kids in Hot Lunch sat down, and those in Cold Lunch stood up 
•    We loved Wednesdays because it was a half of day….. This is when those public school kids learned how to be Catholic
•    How we waited for Joe the pretzel man with the assistance of the nuns to make a decision on which class would get the left over pretzels.
•    The Honor, the prestige, the machismo of finally being able to be a patrol boy…. Carrying that silver badge, pinned on to the white belt.  Unfortunately, many of us used it as a weapon to intimidate people.

Tom & Joe Giacopelli[/quote]
Joe & Tom --

I think I lived around the corner from you.  I lived on 226th between 120th Avenue and Francis Lewis and my cousin Karen lived on your block!  Forgot all about "wolf's pond"!!!   Didn't you live next to Phillip Pati (sp?)?  You also have a sister MaryLou?

Lorie

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#1030 2010-10-28 20:41:15

nealsims
Member
Registered: 2008-07-26
Posts: 14

Re: cambria heights, Queens

Our family doctor when I was little in the 60's was Anthony Davino on 221st Street. I always passed his corner house on the way to Sacred Heart. On a whim I just looked him up in the white pages on line. There is an Anthony Davino listed in Cambria Heights (no address or phone number given) who is 93 years old. This COULD be him. Does anyone know if the doctor still lives there?

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#1031 2010-10-29 08:08:02

Timbo
Member
Registered: 2009-06-09
Posts: 30

Re: cambria heights, Queens

[quote=nealsims]Our family doctor when I was little in the 60's was Anthony Davino on 221st Street. I always passed his corner house on the way to Sacred Heart. On a whim I just looked him up in the white pages on line. There is an Anthony Davino listed in Cambria Heights (no address or phone number given) who is 93 years old. This COULD be him. Does anyone know if the doctor still lives there?[/quote]
Hey Neil, Do not know the Doctor. But I lived on 114th ave and 221st street. Where was his office. Did you get the photo?

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#1032 2010-10-29 23:39:07

TGHD
New member
Registered: 2010-10-16
Posts: 4

Re: cambria heights, Queens

Hey, is there anyone out there who knows Frank Pezzo, Victor Patti, Tom and Joe Farranda,  Barbara Verde, Chritopher Rooter, Maureen Jennings, Joe Morgan, Maureen Brown, or anyone who graduated from Sacred Heart in Cambria Heights,  in the year 1968?

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#1033 2010-10-31 21:48:31

COJAC
Member
Registered: 2009-12-31
Posts: 12

Re: cambria heights, Queens

I graduated in 68. Frank Pezzo is on facebook.I was also a paperboy with Victor Patti, but I think he was a year older than I

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#1034 2010-11-01 08:04:16

Timbo
Member
Registered: 2009-06-09
Posts: 30

Re: cambria heights, Queens

TGHD, If you are looking for me to send you that Photo. You need to send me your E-Mail.

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#1035 2010-11-10 17:26:05

Olivia
Member
Registered: 2009-03-01
Posts: 1333

Re: cambria heights, Queens

To all the veterans on this board--Thank you & God bless you.

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#1036 2010-11-16 17:38:32

Mike The Duck
Member
Registered: 2008-05-13
Posts: 197

Re: cambria heights, Queens

[quote=nealsims]Our family doctor when I was little in the 60's was Anthony Davino on 221st Street. I always passed his corner house on the way to Sacred Heart. On a whim I just looked him up in the white pages on line. There is an Anthony Davino listed in Cambria Heights (no address or phone number given) who is 93 years old. This COULD be him. Does anyone know if the doctor still lives there?[/quote]
I don't know for sure, but I'll be you it was the same man. Where exactly was his office on 221st Street?

Mike

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#1037 2010-11-17 18:21:52

Olivia
Member
Registered: 2009-03-01
Posts: 1333

Re: cambria heights, Queens

nealsims--my younger bros went to SH w/a boy named Anthony Davino in the early 60's. He was in their Cub scout den & my Mom was den mother. I think his father was a doctor, but my long term memory is not very trustworthy. When I speak to either of them, I'll ask if they remember where Anthony lived.

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#1038 2010-11-18 21:26:59

TGHD
New member
Registered: 2010-10-16
Posts: 4

Re: cambria heights, Queens

lorie922 - Yes, my brother and I did live on 227th street.... How did you know my sister and us for that matter?

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#1039 2010-11-19 18:20:29

tjjelin
New member
Registered: 2010-11-19
Posts: 2

Re: cambria heights, Queens

Somebody asked about Twin Ponds.  This was the ponds located off the Cross Island Parkway; I believe was more of a stream that was on the east side of the Cross Island Pkwy near Linden Blvd, then was on the west side of the parkway near Laurelton, eventually running into that park with the lake near Rosedale; the park is still there, I forget the name; we used to fish in that lake; there you could see the large goldfish.  In the early days (late 50's) there were lots of fish in Twin Ponds and even snapping turtles; we used to fish there all the time, and on the way home one time let a fish free in Wolfs Pond @ 227th St and 120th Ave where there always was a huge puddle in the street.  We did get the fish out I remember and brought it back to Twin Ponds!  By the way, did anybody ever play baseball or football at "Windy Field" which was the name of the grassy section where the Cross Island Parkway split into the Belt Pkwy and Southern State Pkwy.  You would have to cross one of these to get there, but it was a good place to play ball!  Lots of memories for sure!

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#1040 2010-11-24 09:14:25

Olivia
Member
Registered: 2009-03-01
Posts: 1333

Re: cambria heights, Queens

Happy Thanksgiving everyone.

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#1041 2010-11-24 09:31:18

Mike The Duck
Member
Registered: 2008-05-13
Posts: 197

Re: cambria heights, Queens

Yep, may you all be happy and enjoy the day!

Mike

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#1042 2010-12-19 10:07:20

D From Cambria Heights
New member
Registered: 2010-12-19
Posts: 1

Re: cambria heights, Queens

I grew up in Cambria Heights my family was one of the first black families to move into the area in 1963.  My early memories we of a neighborhood divided except in school.  I attended PS 147, JHS 192 and Andrew Jackson.  I grew up on Springfield BLvd and Francis Lewis in a house that my mom still lives in to this day.When I was in my elementary years there was a no mans land that you didnt cross.  And there were places that you didnt go to.  The pool room on the side street of Cambria Theater, The Boys Club at 224th and Linden and for god sakes you didnt go to Carvels across the bridge.  When we rode bikes on Saturday mornings we did so in packs just for the feeling of protection.  Going to Vicks Hobby Shop was always a treat even though all we ever did was replace the cars on the track when they went off. 
Cambria Heights was a great place to grow up before white flight AND AFTER.  We had everything that we needed right there on Linden Blvd, the 5 and 10 next to the movie house, Izzies (United Cigars) which later got bought by Smitty the pervert whose pants hung so low you could see the crack of his butt.  An earlier post by another african american said it pretty well we were middle class folks and in many cases professionals looking for a better life.  My mom a school teacher and my dad a minister wanted the same things that we all wanted, nice neighborhood, good schools, a sense of promise.  I get a chance to see Cambria Heights every day as I drive to my office in Westchester, or I visit my Mom.   Andrew Jackson my beloved High School is now Campus Magnet, Bohack is a string of retail and office shops, Grand Union is Farmbria Supermaket, and The Pool Hall is a day care center.  Gouz is now Western Beef, Great Eastern is HOME Depot and Walcliff Skating Rink is is an ill conceived townhouse subdivision. 

Some of the posts in this thread are painful because I do remember the hostility in the neighborhood especially after MLK was assasinated.  It was hard for the few well meaning white families to endure the escalating threats of violence. Block busting had alot to do with it, bussing took care of the rest.  When I was approaching the age when I could attend high school there was no choice but to go to Jackson, I wanted to go there anyway because i was a track athlete and Milton Blatt, the revered coach ran one of the best track programs in the state.  He retired in my sophmore year and the field was named after him.  I havent heard that term colin field in years, I spent many weekends in the basketball courts of playing football on the field.  Coming up though there were separate parks, the blacks played in the concrete playground behind 147 and the whites had the run of Colin Field.  I didnt even venture into the colin field playground until one of my friends moved onto 217th street near the park.  The funny thing though was that I never questioned why it was that way.  It just was and I didnt think too much about it.  If I wanted to be safe and feel safe I had to go to places that welcomed me, Colin Field was not one of those places.  Some of this might surprise many of you and I'm sure that for the most part you didnt even know that these conditions existed in our Cambria Heights but they did.  Not your fault or mine though we were just kids trying to have a good time in very tense circumstances.  I cant hold you responsible for the strange looks, the nword taunts or being chased back across the bridge any more than you can hold me responsible for being robbed on the Q4 or being picked on for no reason at AJHS. 
And speaking of Andrew Jackson there are many distinguished black alumnus from Andrew Jackson High School. It did not go down the tubes at the onset of White Flight, it went down the tubes from the devasting effects of the crack epidemic and the drug dealing and extreme violence associated with it. Many African American families moved out of Cambria Heights in the mid eighties to mid nineties only to be replaced by hard working  immigrant families from the caribean. Cambria Heights now is predominantly Haitian and Jamaican now with a smattering of  mature african american families. I drive down Linden Blvd and get nostalgic for the bakery that opened at 4:00AM on Sunday mornings so that the Long Island Press paper boys could buy their crumb buns for 35 cents before they folded their Sunday papers. (yeah I was a paper boy too).  The deli across form the old post office that had Liverhust heros and mission soda for 37 cents.  A to Z hardware where you could buy axles for your go carts with the hole for the cotter pin already drilled in.    Joe the Good Humor man who had a limp and would give you credit till the next day if you didnt have a quarter that day.

I remember it all the good and the bad, and the only lesson I can take from it is to value every day and every memory because as much as you try to fight it things never last forever good or bad.

Cambria Heights was a great place to grow up no matter what.

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#1043 2010-12-20 09:06:56

Olivia
Member
Registered: 2009-03-01
Posts: 1333

Re: cambria heights, Queens

DfromCH--Thanx for the post. I grew up in CH, a little closer to St Albans. The house still stands on the corner where Murdock, Colfax & 211St all meet. I went to AJHS from '56 to '60. Milton Blatt was my English teacher & guidance counsellor. As a white woman, it's an eye opener for me to see things from your perspective, especially since you are able to describe your experiences so calmly, without resentment. I'm enjoying reading what all of the old places have morphed into. Thank you. Have you read "The Color of Water" by James McBride? You might enjoy it. Some of his experiences are much like yours.

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#1044 2010-12-21 12:26:26

L.ANGELONE
New member
Registered: 2010-12-21
Posts: 1

Re: cambria heights, Queens

HELLO TO ALL CAMBRIA RESIDENTS.  WOW,  WHAT A SITE.

MY NAME IS LOUIE ANGELONE  230 ST.  I MOVED TO CH IN 1961.  GRADUATED SH IN 1965,  WENT ON TO CHRIST THE KING HS (GRADUATED IN '69) .  THEN ONTO THE NYPD.

I WAS GIVEN THIS SITE BY ANOTHER CH PAST RESIDENT, BOBBY ROSA,  (221 st)  WHO I JUST RECENTLY HOOKED UP WITH- AFTER 40 YEARS.  HE CONTACTED ME LAST SUNDAY BY EMAIL.  I GUESS YOU CAN IMAGINE WHAT A SURPRISE THAT WAS.  HE IS NOW DOWN IN FLORIDA.   


CAMBRIA HEIGHTS-   WHAT CAN I SAY ?  I AM THERE , AT LEAST 1-2 TIMES A WEEK,  CHECKING IN ON MOM.  THATS RIGHT,  86 YEARS OLD AND SHE DOESNT WANT TO LEAVE.  I GUESS, WHO CAN BLAME HER ?

ALL THE MEMORIES,   AS MANY OF YOU HAVE REMINDED ME OF.   IT WAS A GREAT PLACE TO GROW UP.


HAS ANYONE BEEN IN CONTACT WITH OR KNOW WHERE THESE PEOPLE ARE? FRANKIE McKENNA,  ANDREA MINNO,  ARLENE FRUGGIERO  (MY 8th GRADE CRUSH) ,  BLAINE MUZIO, ANNEMARIE SCHIAVONE (7th Grade Crush) , SAL MUSSARA, MIKE MASTERSON,, TOMMY KANTOR (I SEE TOMMY HAD POSTED SOME IN 2008)  IT WOULD BE GREAT TO HEAR FROM THE OLD CROWD.

Last edited by L.ANGELONE (2010-12-24 11:45:49)

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#1045 2010-12-28 08:52:32

john m
Member
Registered: 2008-05-12
Posts: 257

Re: cambria heights, Queens

This most recent snowfall, and the two from last year, hearken back to the days of our youth when you could count on making some money every winter shoveling snow.  In the days before snow blowers, tractors and plow attachments, it was good old muscle power and the long handled, metal scooped shovels.  And who better than tweens and teens to provide that muscle.   Of course, after shoveling the family front walks and driveway and piling the snow on either side in very high mounds, who had the desire for more.

My unstated strategy was to do the minimal amount of shoveling at home in order to get out and make money.  That meant a shovel-width's path for the walk and a "just wider than a car" width path in the drive.  My father's expectations were somewhat different.  "Clear the entire walk and drive and then work on widening the entrance/exit to the street in case we approach from either direction."  That latter was like being sentenced to the gulag as shoveling in that oft-plowed crust was the most difficult and often had to be done multiple times.  Also, dad's definition of the perfect entrance to the drive was quite a bit different from my own.  If I envisioned a straight line to the street, dad expected a graceful bugle shape that extended well beyond the width of the drive.  And where did all that snow go?  In tall, vertical piles, of course, as there were no flat areas in which to push it.  Some winters, it seemed like we shoveled and lifted snow into piles much taller than either of us.  (Can't forget to mention that my sisters all helped as well so I am sure it wasn't quite as difficult as I like to recount.)

When I am honest with myself, I laugh even thinking about it.  Having just cleared a 60ft double car width drive of about 14 inches of snow, the short narrow drive we had in that Queens 40x100 lot seems like a piece of cake.  Plus, since I am now the driver, the entrance to my drive is a perfect bugle shape, extending an extra 15 rounded feet on either side of the drive.  And hacking through the 5 ft of plowed snow to get to the mailbox is just plain common sense.  Funny how smart our parents were in retrospect.

Since this started off as a "snow shoveling for money" post, one quick story and then a shovel comment.

On our street in Queens, 224th st, there were two older, widowed sisters living side by side.  After one particlularly heavy snowfall, my friend Jimmy Amoroso knocked on my door and asked if I wanted to help him shovel the two houses.  He had offered  to do both for $10.  For the then princely sum of $5,  I jumped at it and we each tackled one house.  Working without the supervision or instructions from my father, I quickly applied my minimalist strategy and had a "shovel width" path in the front walks and a barely wider than a car width in the driveway.  I collected my $5 and was back home ready to enjoy a cup of hot chocolate (Nestle's of course).  What I hadn't counted on was the inspector, my mother.  Mom walked down to the widows' houses and inspected our work.  She was back in a snap and, a few minutes later, I was back outside re-shoveling both houses to the proper degree, i.e. clearing the entire walks and driveway.  My plea of "but they were satisfied" went unheeded.  I still remember her words, "how you could embarrass me like that".

A comment on the shovel ...  There were several shovel designs but I refer to the one with the long wooden handle and the iron or steel blade.  The latter was arced and about 16-20 inches wide and the shovel itself was heavy.   It worked well when the snow was crusty and you could push it.  But when the snow was wet and heavy and you had to lift every shovelful, it was a bear.  And then when the bottom edge of the shovel bent, even pushing the snow became an experience.  And let's not even get into what a pain it was when the snow stuck to the shovel.

I thought those days were gone, but lately, I'm starting to think they're back.

john m

Last edited by john m (2010-12-28 08:55:23)

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#1046 2010-12-28 10:27:28

Olivia
Member
Registered: 2009-03-01
Posts: 1333

Re: cambria heights, Queens

John M---You brought up alot of snow memories (especially for my brothers). I can't imagine any kid doing all that shoveling nowadays for $5. Actually, they don't seem to shovel snow for money anymore. Here's a Newsday site that a member posted on the Gotham board. It's 60 years of major snow storms in the 5 boros & LI. My daughter was born during the blizzard of '69. Newsday's photos are good.
http://www.newsday.com/long-island/li-blizzard-history-60-years-of-snow-1.203376

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#1047 2010-12-28 10:51:39

Sal
Member
Registered: 2009-08-03
Posts: 2980

Re: cambria heights, Queens

John M-Glad to have you back.

Olivia- Kids in my neighborhood were asking $25 up to shovel. Plow trucks-$100 up.

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#1048 2010-12-28 12:00:25

Olivia
Member
Registered: 2009-03-01
Posts: 1333

Re: cambria heights, Queens

Sal--Those prices make me glad that I'm in a senior living complex. Snow removal is right up to my garage door & a storm like this one makes it worth the condo fees.

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#1049 2010-12-28 14:01:12

john m
Member
Registered: 2008-05-12
Posts: 257

Re: cambria heights, Queens

Another quick Cambria story that involved clearing snow, this time at SH church.  It was some evening event around Christmas or the early winter.  We had had a large snow storm and while most of the heavy shoveling was done, the custodian asked for volunteers to spread salt.  Volunteers were excused from whatever function we were in, so a handful of us quickly raised our hands.

We were each given a large plastic bucket of salt and assigned an area.  We spread the salt by hand and when the bucket was empty, we headed back to the gargare for refills.  I don't think it required many trips or buckets.   We were probably not paid for the work but we had fun and were not stuck inside in the function.

It wasn't until the next morning that I learned a lesson about salt and how it shouldn't be handled.  While the custodian had provided us with bucket and salt, he had not provided gloves or advice.  I simply used the leather gloves I had worn to church that evening.  Maybe you can guess what happened.  My nice leather gloves had become completely dried out.  They were dessicated, almost mummified from handling the salt.  They were totally useless and and had to be discarded (although now that I write this, I wonder if I could have rehydrated them somehow).  Lesson learned.

john m

Last edited by john m (2010-12-28 14:05:28)

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#1050 2010-12-28 18:34:41

COJAC
Member
Registered: 2009-12-31
Posts: 12

Re: cambria heights, Queens

John M. God you write so well.Snow to me mean't MONEY!!!! Not today, I live in the Philly area and to get a kid to shovel snow is impossible.I recently had an injury and could not dig my car out this weekend and guess what? It's still not dug out.I offered 3 set's of kids $40.00 to dig it out and was turned down by all 3. Had to get home to their play station I guess.I't wouldn't have taken more than ten minutes of their time, go figure....I lived on 121st Ave. across from Colin Field and we had to fight the snow plows to keep our driveways open.  Ohhh what memories.

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