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#1 2011-03-30 15:50:22

Poppy
Member
Registered: 2011-03-13
Posts: 627

Steak Houses in New York

[img]http://images.yuku.com/image/pjpeg/57d26f947e427fd1c048d8f61a2e0f116eaee849.jpg[/img]


According to the food historians, steak houses originated in New York City. Why? New Yorkers could afford to spend the most money and demanded the best cuts of beef.

"Americans had developed a great appetite for beef by the turn of the century, and after Detroit meat-packer G. H. Hammond brought out the refrigerated railway car in 1871, chilled carcasses became readily available in the East, though fresh beef was still not common in the outer reaches of the western frontier. Still, by the 1880s beef was being shipped even to England, and "steakhouses" were among the most popular restaurants in large American cities."


"True, the Old Homestead in Manhattan opened in 1868, Keens Chop House in 1885, Brooklyn's Gage & Tollner debuted in 1879, and Peter Luger in 1887, but those revered establishments drew more on English and German models. Luger still features only one cut of steak--the sliced porterhouse, a term derived from English taverns serving porter beer and popularized about 1814 as a steak in America by porterhouse proprietor Martin Morrison in New York. The New York steakhouse--a term still used outside New York to draw customers in the same way ads proclaim "London pub" or "Parisian bistro"--developed along lines drawn at Palm (1926) and Gallagher's (1927), both of which originated as speakeasies during the Noble Experiment of Prohibition. Palm was run by two Italians, John Ganzi and Pio Bozzi, on Second Avenue. (The name was supposed to be "Parma," after the owners' hometown, but a city bureaucrat spelled it wrong on an official document, and so "Palm" it remained.) Gallagher's, on 52nd Street off Broadway, was named after former Ziegfeld-girl-turned-speakeasy-owner, Helen Gallagher. Both places democratically served a little beer, a little hooch and a little beefsteak to everyone from New York's politicians and journalists to Caf‚ Society, who sometimes got their pictures or caricatures put up on the walls. Such places had a swagger, a very masculine feel to them and a perception of exclusivity that made everyone want to go there. After Prohibition ended in 1933, Palm, Gallagher's, Jack Lyons, Manny Wolf, Cavanaugh's, Christ Cella and Farrish's flourished. New York steakhouses got the best meat because they paid the most and charged the highest prices. The menu, rarely varied, became a formula for success: prime beef, lamb chops, lobsters, fried potatoes and cheesecake were pretty much the whole shebang. Wine lists were unknown until the 1980s, when Sparks and Smith & Wollensky invested heavily in wine cellars..."


"Steak, rather than hamburger or the hot dog, is probably the most typical American food. Steak (from Old Norse steik, stick) has meant a strip of meat or fish cooked on a stick over a fire since the 15th century. From the earliest colonial times until the 1860s what you and I call a steak was called a beef steak, to distinguish it from the often more common venison steaks, buffalo steaks....By the 1760s some colonial inns and eating establishments were billing themselves as beef steak houses. Then around 1866 the first Texas longhorns reached New York via the Chisolm Trail and the railroads and soon the backyard cows, pigs, and chickens, and the wild deer and the buffalo, had a competitor--beef raised solely for eating. Thus the modern steak and the cowboy were born together, and since the mid 1860s steak has meant beefsteak. By the end of the 1860s the beef steak house was simply called a steak house...Popular taste...demanded a thick sirloin, broiled over charcoal if possible. Thus in the late 1940s and 50s restaurants often advertised the mouth-watering charcoal-broiled steaks."


"In the Sixties, American liked to eat steak when they went out to dinner, and they liked the exotic allure of Japanese restaurants. Enter the Japanese steak house. There were several different "brands" of steak house, both here and in Japan, but the best known of them all was Benihana. In 1964, the first Benihana of Tokyo restaurant in the United States opened in New York..."


1831: Delmonico steak--New York City
1887: Peter Luger--New York City
1926: The Palm--New York City
1964: Benihana's Japanese steak house--New York City

Are you hungry yet? lol


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#2 2011-03-30 16:52:26

Olivia
Member
Registered: 2009-03-01
Posts: 1334

Re: Steak Houses in New York

Peter Luger's in Brooklyn still my gold standard. When I was a newlywed, we used to go to Manny Wolf's for special occasions.

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#3 2011-03-30 17:00:13

tsquared
Member
Registered: 2009-10-15
Posts: 2149

Re: Steak Houses in New York

Time for dinner....

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#4 2011-03-30 17:05:16

mango
Member
Registered: 2008-05-13
Posts: 566

Re: Steak Houses in New York

I love Peter Luger's.  On special occasions we will make our reservations well in advance and travel from NJ to Brooklyn for hid steak.
Yum time for a special occasion

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#5 2011-03-30 18:00:35

james
Member
From: irvine calif
Registered: 2008-05-13
Posts: 331

Re: Steak Houses in New York

When I worked in NYC I had a position where I was wine & dined. Some of the steak house I frequented were Gallaghers, Homestead, Sparks, Lugers, Smith & Wolinsky's. I don't know if they are still around.  I really preferred the ethnic cusine in NYC to the steakhouse there. And I found steakhouse just as good or better out of town.

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#6 2011-03-30 19:24:12

Sal
Member
Registered: 2009-08-03
Posts: 2980

Re: Steak Houses in New York

James-All of the Steak houses you list are still in business,and at there original location. I think Smith and Wolinsky took over Manny Wolf's at least there in Manny's old location (3rd and 49th).
The Old Homestead now has another location at the Borgota  Casino-Atlantic City.
I use to enjoy the Portuguese Steak Houses on West 46th.

I still have to try Palm 1 or 2.

Last edited by Sal (2011-03-31 09:57:17)

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#7 2011-03-30 20:18:26

james
Member
From: irvine calif
Registered: 2008-05-13
Posts: 331

Re: Steak Houses in New York

Thanks Sal  The last time I visited NYC was in 92    I didn't recognize the place & The only way I keep Up with news is scrolling the boards. Thanks people for all the new/old information. Sal the palms is this restaurant with saw dust on the flloor??  I forget to mention the great out of town steakhouse in the cities where I lived   Cincinnati   the precinct  Tampa berns steakhouse, chicago gene & geonetti  & original mortons while these are great , NYC has 20-30 great steakhouses.

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#8 2011-03-30 22:03:57

nyc02
Member
From: NYC NY 10002
Registered: 2008-05-14
Posts: 991

Re: Steak Houses in New York

Keen's Chophouse on west 36th street will always be my favorite..

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#9 2011-03-31 02:57:38

paddy moore
Member
Registered: 2008-05-12
Posts: 1603

Re: Steak Houses in New York

THE OLD HOMESTEAD HAS NICE ONES IN THE WINDOW ACROSS THE STREET FROM THE MEAT MARKET

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#10 2011-03-31 07:48:15

Jack
Member
Registered: 2008-05-26
Posts: 803

Re: Steak Houses in New York

No one mentioned The Cattleman. I know it's no longer around, but it was a big deal back in the 70s.

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#11 2011-03-31 08:28:15

Pomonoker
Member
Registered: 2008-05-12
Posts: 437

Re: Steak Houses in New York

Back in the day, Max's Kansas City Steakhouse was a place to get a steak, and see and hear some good rock n roll also.

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#12 2011-03-31 11:31:40

CharlieP.
Member
Registered: 2008-05-12
Posts: 2492

Re: Steak Houses in New York

I have heard alot about Peter Lugers. Has anybody gone there recently,and would the price range be out of reach ?

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#13 2011-03-31 11:38:55

tsquared
Member
Registered: 2009-10-15
Posts: 2149

Re: Steak Houses in New York

Been a long time for me too. Is it still a cash only operation?

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#14 2011-04-01 08:43:45

Herb
Member
From: Hudson Valley
Registered: 2008-05-13
Posts: 1521

Re: Steak Houses in New York

My three favs are The Palm, Lugers, and Sparks. I think it's a three way tie. I like Ruth's Chris also. (The Palm and Ruth's have been reliable out of town spots for us, too.)

Not crazy about Morton's, or Smith & Wollensky, in fact I avoid them.

Went to The Palm (The original) yesterday with a client and a few colleagues that work on the same account. The food was beyond fantastic. Everything. Steaks, seafood, salads, sides, wine, and dessert. I don't eat like that very often anymore, but it's great to do it once in awhile.

About top of the line, prime aged beef NYC steakhouses. They are great, but ungodly expensive, and I have learned that if you can find places that have really good aged 'choice' beef, you can still get a great steak and not have to spend a fortune. I'm no snob when it comes to this stuff. Anyone remember Joe Imp's Steakhouse in LIC? That was a good example. I used to love to eat at The Red Horse Inn Steakhouse in Frederick MD, when I was traveling, and I never had a bad meal at Steak & Ale. For our steaks at home, Biancardi's Meats on Arthur Ave, and Taste of Little Italy Deli up here in Monroe have such great choice steaks, you can hardly tell the difference from prime, and cost less than half as much.   

James, sawdust on the floor at Peter Lugers.

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#15 2011-04-01 09:06:38

Sal
Member
Registered: 2009-08-03
Posts: 2980

Re: Steak Houses in New York

Herb-Thanks,I'll go by your review. The next time my broker offers lunch,it will be either the Palm or Sparks!

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#16 2013-09-24 11:43:20

alfonso
Member
Registered: 2013-09-19
Posts: 13

Re: Steak Houses in New York

Peter luger still in Brooklyn and Manhassett. Pricey but well worth it.

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#17 2013-12-17 18:08:23

Sal
Member
Registered: 2009-08-03
Posts: 2980

Re: Steak Houses in New York

Micahel-Thnx for the update. I did not know they were Italian. Were they always at the two 2nd Ave. locations?

II Postino 337 E. 49th formally Antolloti's (sp?) Italian Family style great food.

Watering hole for Truman Capote.

Last edited by Sal (2013-12-17 18:14:15)

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